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Author Peter Wright arrives at Duncansby Head after cycling the Scottish Watershed


By Ali Morrison

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Peter Wright celebrates reaching the trig point at Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios
Peter Wright celebrates reaching the trig point at Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios

An author of a series of book on the Scottish Watershed has arrived at Duncansby Head after a 24-day cycle along the spine of Scotland.

Retired youth worker Peter Wright (74), from Linlithgow, has become one of the first people to cycle the Scottish Watershed route, an imaginary line which follows the watershed where rivers run east from one point and west from another.

Peter, who is married with a grown up family, was raising cash for The Green Team, an Edinburgh and Lothian chairty that supports young people to learn about and connect with nature, others and themselves.

He had set himself the target of raising £5000 and so far has achieved £3321, 66 per cent of the total, with the cash being earmarked for helping young carers have a break from the responsibilities they face on a daily basis.

Peter is the author of four books, three factual and a novel, on what he calls the "Ribbon of Wildness". He has cycled and walked parts on the route on numerous occasions, including visits to Caithness.

After 24 days in the saddle Peter Wright nears journeys end at a fog shrouded Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios
After 24 days in the saddle Peter Wright nears journeys end at a fog shrouded Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios

In his opinion the Watershed ends at the trig point at Duncansby Head, although opinions differ, some believe it ends at Strath Point while others claim it's Cape Wrath.

His arrival at Duncansby Head marked the end of 24 days in the saddle, covering almost 600 miles of roads and tracks. Setting off from a forest South of Hawick, on the Scottish/English border, his route took him along forest tracks, estate tracks and unclassified roads, as well as some public roads.

The long-distance challenge was completely self supported with Peter carrying all his supplies and nights spent in a small tent.

This is the fourth year Peter has done a solo long distance fund-raising challenge, although last year's had to be virtual due to the pandemic, and he says his wife is now banning him from any more solo adventures.

He was welcomed at Duncansby Head by Thurso woman Lorna Stanger, whom he had never met but he had been following her extreme challenges online and had made contact regarding his own adventure.

Peter Wright with Lorna Stanger at the trig point at Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios
Peter Wright with Lorna Stanger at the trig point at Duncansby Head. Picture: Robert MacDonald/Northern Studios

He was picked up by a friend who lives in Helmsdale and after spending a night in the village had an easier ride home to Linlithgow by train the following day.


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