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WATCH: New children’s book from Caithness author


By David G Scott

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Caithness-based writer, Graham Winkle, the children’s author of the Loch Mey Monster series has returned after a 16-year break with a new book, ‘The Sound of The Wind’.

Written for young children and particularly adapted for parents to read to their children. The book follows the story of a child’s experience, listening to the wind outside from his bedroom.

Graham, also known as Graham Maharg the singer/songwriter, gave up a successful garden design and gardening business following a recent accident that led to a diagnosis of chronic regional pain syndrome – a condition with no known cure.

“Having been unable to walk or work properly for the last 18 months, coming back to writing seemed the common sense thing to do,” he said.

The front cover of Loch Mey Monster by Graham Winkle.
The front cover of Loch Mey Monster by Graham Winkle.
Author Graham Winkle.
Author Graham Winkle.

Sixteen years ago, Graham wrote the final book in his Loch Mey Monster series ‘A Beautiful Monster’ but work and raising a family meant he never got the chance to publish it.

“One of my goals is to finally publish the last book in that series too. Most of my readers will be parents now so I hope they read it to their kids.

Graham's new book 'The Sound of the Wind' has just been published.
Graham's new book 'The Sound of the Wind' has just been published.
Illustration for the new book by Graham Winkle.
Illustration for the new book by Graham Winkle.

“Complex regional pain syndrome is, as the name suggests, complex, debilitating and frustrating. I’ve had some great help from individuals in the NHS but I hope more public knowledge of the disease will lead to earlier and better treatment for others in the future.”

Signed hardback copies of The Sound of The Wind are available at Puffin Croft petting farm in John O’Groats.


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