Home   News   Article

Police Scotland's top officer for the Highlands and Islands urges public to stick to new 'stay local' Covid rules this Easter as lockdown eases


By Philip Murray

Get the Courier and Groat sent to your inbox every week and swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper



Chief Supt Conrad Trickett..Picture: James Mackenzie..
Chief Supt Conrad Trickett..Picture: James Mackenzie..

POLICE have urged people to stick to the new Covid restrictions this Easter – after the lockdown was eased slightly as of today.

Prior to Good Friday, residents across Scotland were ordered to 'stay home' and only venture out into their local surroundings for essential purposes – such as shopping or exercise.

But, as of April 2, that law has been replaced by rules to 'stay local', meaning that people may venture further out into their local area – but must stay within their council's boundary. No journeys into other local authority areas, or across Scotland, are yet permitted, as health chiefs try to drive Covid infections as low as possible before further lifting of the restrictions from April 26.

And Police Scotland's Highlands and Islands division commander, Chief Superintendent Conrad Trickett, has urged people to stick to the new rules over the Easter weekend and then on until wider lifting of the restrictions – for the likes of travel and hospitality – takes place at the end of this month.

"The coronavirus regulations have had a significant impact on our lives and I would like to thank the vast majority of people who are sticking to the rules and doing the right thing to avoid the spread of the virus as we move through the easing of restrictions," he said.

“People should not travel outwith their local authority area except for essential purposes. While Easter weekend is traditionally a time for visiting friends and family, I would urge people to stay local and follow the regulations on gatherings.

“If you are visiting beauty spots within your local area, do so safely and respectfully – leaving no trace of your visit. Please also park responsibly to allow emergency access.

"Our approach throughout the pandemic has been to engage with the public, explain the legislation and encourage compliance, but we will not hesitate to use our enforcement powers as a last resort."


Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.


Get a digital copy of the Courier and Groat delivered straight to your inbox every week allowing you to swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper - it looks just like it does in print!

SUBSCRIBE NOW


This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More
');