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New NFU Scotland president


By Jean Gunn

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New NFU Scotland president Martin Kennedy. Picture: Ian R Fleming
New NFU Scotland president Martin Kennedy. Picture: Ian R Fleming

Perthshire farmer Martin Kennedy takes over one of the top jobs in Scottish agriculture after being elected the 63rd president of NFU Scotland.

Mr Kennedy, who has been a vice-president at the union since 2017, was elected unopposed today (Friday) during an NFU virtual council meeting in Glasgow.

The new vice presidents are Andrew Connon, of North Quilquox, Ythanbank, Ellon, and Robin Traquair, Wellington Farm, Millerhill, Dalkeith, a cousin of Caithness farmer, James Traquair, Geiselittle, Thurso.

Mr Connon and Mr Traquair were elected after a keenly fought vice-presidential contest which saw them run against Willie Harper and George Milne.

New vice president, Midlothian pig farmer Robin Traquair, who was a finalist in the Farmers Weekly Awards 2014.
New vice president, Midlothian pig farmer Robin Traquair, who was a finalist in the Farmers Weekly Awards 2014.

The presidential position will be held by Mr Kennedy for two years and a president can serve a maximum of two consecutive two-year terms. Under the terms of the constitution, Mr Connon and Mr Traquair, being elected to the position of vice president for the first time, will initially serve for two years before the post reverts to an annual election.

After the election, NFU Scotland’s new president commented: “It goes without saying that it is indeed a great honour to be elected president of NFU Scotland. This is a role I recognise carries a huge responsibility to represent all our members in all sectors of farming and crofting throughout Scotland.

“Without question we will have some real challenges ahead as we strive to meet not only climate change and environmental targets, but also at the same time continue to carry out our fundamental role of food production."

Mr Kennedy, who served two years as Highland Perthshire branch chairman, added: “I see these challenges as opportunities, and provided we implement a positive future agricultural policy, one that’s right for Scotland, then we can create a profitable industry that’s the envy of many across the globe.”


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