Home   News   Article

Highlanders urged to seek free debt advice in new Direct Advice Scotland campaign


By Calum MacLeod

Easier access to your trusted, local news. Subscribe to a digital package and support local news publishing.



Advice Direct Scotland chief executive Andrew Bartlett.
Advice Direct Scotland chief executive Andrew Bartlett.

A nationwide campaign gets underway today to encourage Scots to seek free debt advice if they are struggling with their bills.

The Advice Direct Scotland campaign will include adverts on commercial radio, in newspapers, on buses and on digital street hubs across Scotland.

Scots are being urged to contact the charity’s free debt advice service, moneyadvice.scot, which provides information and support on a wide range of debt-related issues and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

Specialist debt advisers can work with people to assess their current situation, look at their income and outgoings, and consider what to do next.

The campaign comes amid growing concerns about the cost of living, with inflation rising and steep energy price hikes on the horizon.

January is a particularly difficult time for many families following high levels of Christmas spending.

The moneyadvice.scot service from Advice Direct Scotland includes a knowledge centre with helpful information and live chat at www.moneyadvice.scot. The free service can also be contacted on 0808 800 9060 between 9am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Andrew Bartlett, chief executive of Advice Direct Scotland, said: “This is a timely campaign to help Scots struggling with the burden of debt.

“We know that January is a particularly difficult time for many, and there are widespread concerns about a cost-of-living crisis this year – especially with energy bills set to soar.

“For those worried about their financial commitments, we’re proud to run moneyadvice.scot on top of our extensive consumer advice service.

“Our specialist debt advisers are on hand if you have personal financial worries, are struggling with debt, or need a way of getting back on track.

“People don’t have to suffer alone, and sometimes talking things through with an adviser can help.”


Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More