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Lorna leads Scottish Sirens to bronze place in Aussie rules Euro Cup


By Alan Hendry

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Lorna Murdoch in her Scotland Sirens kit. Picture: Mark A Brown
Lorna Murdoch in her Scotland Sirens kit. Picture: Mark A Brown

Thurso woman Lorna Murdoch led her Scottish Sirens Aussie rules football team to a creditable third place in the Euro Cup competition in Edinburgh on Saturday.

The Sirens' first pool match was against Sweden, who were comprehensively beaten 28-12. The Sirens' second pool match was an altogether closer affair against the Welsh Wyverns who edged it 14-12.

These results meant that the Scottish women made it to the semi-finals by being the best scoring team not to top one of the three pool groups.

In the semis the Scots were beaten 22-3 by the eventual runners-up, England Vixens. Although a decisive victory for the Vixens, this was the Sirens’ best result against an ever dominant England team for the Scottish women.

The Sirens then played the Welsh Wyverns for third place. The Scottish women secured a 20-4 victory and a bronze medal.

The Scottish Sirens team, with Lorna first left in the back row. Picture: Fiona Murdoch
The Scottish Sirens team, with Lorna first left in the back row. Picture: Fiona Murdoch

After the tournament an exhausted but happy Lorna (37) said: "I could not be prouder or happier with this final result. All the Scottish girls played out their skin, and to come away as third in Europe is an unbelievable feeling."

Lorna, who now lives in Edinburgh, first played mini-rugby at the age of six. She discovered Aussie rules six years ago and was immediately recommended to try for the national side.

Recently she captained her club side, the Edinburgh Bloods, to fourth place in the European Club Champions Cup – the highest place ever by a Scottish club, male or female.

Aussie rules football has been described as like a cross between rugby and Gaelic football and the game is growing in popularity in Europe.


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