Home   News   Article

Wick youngster highlights ‘great opportunity’ at Highland Youth Parliament event


By John Davidson

Register for free to read more of the latest local news. It's easy and will only take a moment.



Click here to sign up to our free newsletters!
Megan Travers, chair of Highland Youth Parliament (Wick), piper and vice-chair of the Highland Youth Parliament, Dougal Masterson (Dingwall), Highland youth convener Orla MacLeod (Skye), and Nicola Killean, children and young people’s commissioner leading the Walk a Mile for mental health.
Megan Travers, chair of Highland Youth Parliament (Wick), piper and vice-chair of the Highland Youth Parliament, Dougal Masterson (Dingwall), Highland youth convener Orla MacLeod (Skye), and Nicola Killean, children and young people’s commissioner leading the Walk a Mile for mental health.

Caithness and Sutherland were well represented at an event focusing on the mental wellbeing of young people in the Highlands on Friday.

Megan Travers from Wick, chair of the Highland Youth Parliament, attended the annual youth parliament event in Inverness along with more than 100 delegates from secondary schools across the region.

They included a group of young people from Kinlochbervie who shared their views and experiences of issues impacting young people in some of the region’s most remote areas.

The conference at Inverness Leisure included a range of representatives from services working with young people including High Life Highland, UHI and Highlands and Islands Enterprise.

As part of the event, all delegates took to the Queens Park running track to “Walk a Mile” for young people’s mental health, supported by the organisation, See Me.

Focusing on mental health provided the opportunity to learn and explore how young people can help their peers and the Highland Youth Parliament launched a poster highlighting useful mental health support and resources for young people.

The event’s keynote speaker, Nicola Killean, children and young people’s commissioner, said: “All children have the right to the highest attainable standard of health, yet mental health and the challenges they face when accessing support is one of the main issues young people continue to raise with me.

“Spending time with peers and knowing where to go for information and support can help enormously. That’s just one of the reasons why this Highland Youth Parliament event is so vital – it’s an important way of bringing together young people and connecting them to the organisations and trusted adults charged with delivering their services.

“It’s also an opportunity to take time out to have fun and do activities that promote good mental health – it has been fantastic to be a part of it.”

Megan Travers added: “It has been great to see so many young people coming along to the conference and enjoying the experience. This has been a great opportunity for them to speak to the many different organisations that offer services here in the Highlands.”

Harvey MacDonald and Lachlan Price-Davies of Kinlochbervie agreed: “It’s been great to attend the Highland Youth Parliament and speak to people about the important issues we face living in a rural community. We hope by attending events like this we can encourage improvements in some of our facilities and infrastructure.”

Participants at the event were also able to enjoy a variety of wellbeing activities including free swim and gym sessions with High Life Highland, yoga, exercise classes and tours of the Botanic Gardens. There was also the opportunity to explore their family history at the Highland Archive Centre.

Highland youth convener Orla MacLeod said: "The Highland Youth Parliament is a great chance for young people to get together to talk about the issues that are important to them and to discuss the ways they can make changes in these areas. There has been a lot of focus today on mental health which, as always, has been raised as a priority by the young people, along with preparing for exams and the future, vaping and working rights, among others.”


Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More