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Second generation Gaelic plan sets out council’s ambitions


By SPP Reporter


The council is determined to increase the number of Gaelic speakers and significantly enhance the profile of Gaelic.
The council is determined to increase the number of Gaelic speakers and significantly enhance the profile of Gaelic.

THE Highland Council’s Gaelic committee has agreed to recommend the authority’s second generation Gaelic Language Plan for approval to the full council on April 5.

The plan for 2012-16 sets out the council’s aims and ambitions for Gaelic over the next four years and details how these will be achieved.

It does not replace the 2007-11 version, but builds on the council’s ongoing successes in growing Gaelic.

There are five themes of the plan, all of which contribute to increasing the number of Gaelic speakers.

They are: Gaelic in the home and community; Gaelic in education; Gaelic in the arts, media and heritage; Gaelic in the workplace and Gaelic in economic development.

Chairman of the Gaelic committee Councillor Hamish Fraser said: "I am delighted that the council has developed a second generation Gaelic plan, and I’m also proud of our achievements in strengthening the language across education, public services and also in events and initiatives which contribute to the educational, cultural and economic wellbeing of the Highlands.

"We have extensively consulted with the public and held workshops for all council members on the draft Gaelic plan, and the comments and views we have received have been incorporated into the plan."

The council is determined to increase the number of Gaelic speakers and significantly enhance the profile of Gaelic.

To achieve aspirations there will be a strong focus on actions for young people and families particularly in education; and in the home and communities. There will also be an increase in the use and profile of Gaelic within council services and work will be done to strengthen and build Gaelic with a range of partner organisations across the arts, media and heritage and the economic development sectors.

The council will also work to ensure the interests of Gaelic are taken into consideration within its spheres of influence including the community planning partnership locally and the wider levels of government.

Council convener Sandy Park said: "When we launched our Gaelic Language Plan in 2008 we were proud to be the first public body in Scotland to do so. Since this milestone a lot of work has been done to turn aspirations into a reality. We see boosting the status and use of Gaelic as a priority and as a council we are committed to promoting the Gaelic language and culture."



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