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Prince Charles enjoys Society of Caithness Artists exhibition before fishing on River Naver


By Iain Grant

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Ian Pearson at the Society of Caithness Artists exhibition in Thurso. Picture: DGS
Ian Pearson at the Society of Caithness Artists exhibition in Thurso. Picture: DGS

Prince Charles enjoyed two of his favourite pastimes during his current stay in the far north.

He dropped in on an art exhibition in Thurso before heading west for a spot of salmon fishing on the River Naver.

The prince, known as the Duke of Rothesay north of the border, arrived just before 1pm on Thursday for a private visit to the annual exhibition staged by the Society of Caithness Artists.

He was greeted at the entrance by society chairman and renowned glass craftsman Ian Pearson.

The heir-to-the-throne spent half-an-hour or so browsing round the show in the ETEC building of the North Highland College UHI campus.

A keen artist, he loaned two watercolours, Kilphedir Pool on The River Helmsdale, Sutherland and Abandoned Crofts on Stroma.

He spent time perusing a tribute to Thurso artist and society stalwart Joan Powell, who died earlier this year.

The exhibition, which ended on Friday, has 330 exhibits from 91 artists.

It is the first time the venue has hosted the exhibition and it is the first live event the society has been able to put on since before the pandemic.

Mr Pearson said afterwards: "He was very impressed with the building and with the quality of the work on display.

"He was struck by the diversity of the exhibits and had a good look around."

Prince Charles with Vice-Lieutenant of Caithness Willie Watt during the recent public engagement when the Duke of Rothesay, as he is known in Scotland, visited Caithness Foodbank. Picture: DGS
Prince Charles with Vice-Lieutenant of Caithness Willie Watt during the recent public engagement when the Duke of Rothesay, as he is known in Scotland, visited Caithness Foodbank. Picture: DGS

The duke's first visit was 20 years ago when he continued the patronage of his grandmother, the late Queen Mother, who had forged the royal family’s far north link when she bought the Castle of Mey in the early 1950s.

After his visit to the exhibition, he headed west to enjoy some salmon fishing on the River Naver.

He is due to make an appearance at Mey Highland Games on Saturday before ending his stay at the castle on Sunday.


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