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Nucleus exhibition will look at rich agricultural history of Caithness


By Alan Hendry

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Peat-cutting in progress around 1930, a classic Caithness agricultural scene. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Peat-cutting in progress around 1930, a classic Caithness agricultural scene. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives

An exhibition in Wick next month will give a fascinating glimpse into the county's agricultural heritage.

It takes place at the Nucleus archive centre from July 11-22 and will include storyboards, multimedia displays and historical records.

Caithness has a rich agricultural past, from township and run-rig systems pre-19th century, through crofting endeavours to larger-scale arable and pastoral farming.

The exhibition will run from Monday to Friday, from 10am to 4pm, at the centre near Wick John O'Groats Airport.

It coincides with the return of the County Show, scheduled for Thurso East on July 15/16.

Nucleus is planning to have a tent at the show on the Saturday to promote the exhibition and talk to members of the public about any records they may be willing to deposit with the archive.

Plans by architect Sinclair Macdonald for a farm servant's cottage at West Watten, dated 1913. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Plans by architect Sinclair Macdonald for a farm servant's cottage at West Watten, dated 1913. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Corn byke at Myrelandhorn in 1905. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Corn byke at Myrelandhorn in 1905. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Sheep being auctioned around 1960 – another of the images in the Nucleus exhibition. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives
Sheep being auctioned around 1960 – another of the images in the Nucleus exhibition. Picture: Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives

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